Herbert Marcuse and the Frankfurt School. 1978

In this rare televised broadcast from February 2, 1978, the philosopher and political theorist Herbert Marcuse explains how the Frankfurt School re-evaluated Marxism when world economic crisis failed to destroy capitalism as predicted by Marx. He also analyses the philosophical roots of the student rebellions of the sixties. Its intruiging to see Marcuse explain his philosophical and political positioning. (Split into five parts. Language is English.)

Part 1

Herbert Marcuse on the Frankfurt School: Section 1 of 5

Part 2

Herbert Marcuse on the Frankfurt School: Section 2 of 5

Part 3

Herbert Marcuse on the Frankfurt School: Section 3 of 5

Part 4

Herbert Marcuse on the Frankfurt School: Section 4 of 5

Part 5

Herbert Marcuse on the Frankfurt School: Section 5 of 5

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Heaslop
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Heaslop

This holds true! Law and order are always and everywhere the law and order which portect the established hierarchy.

Ursula W
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Ursula W

The Frankfurt School has/had such a great influence on cultural theory…Marcuse is certainly one of the stalwarts.

benoit
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benoit

was he a Nazi like Heiddeger as well? jus thinkin.

Stuart M
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Stuart M

the interviewer is Brian Macgee I think. He was quite active in the BBC in the 70s.

Taylor
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Taylor

I think Marcuse taught in University of California San Diego (UCSD) during the sixties. He certainly provided a theoretical frame and an alternative to Marxism for students’ activism against the repressive tendencies of the affluent society.RESPECT.

Debolina
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Debolina

Can’t get over his accent though…….

Judy
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Judy

I subscribed to your rss :-)

Doc in Black
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Doc in Black

Great! He wrote once “Surely, no government can be expected to foster its own subversion, but in a democracy such a right is vested in the people (i.e. in the majority of the people). This means that the ways should not be blocked on which a subversive majority could develop, and if they are blocked by organized repression and indoctrination, their reopening may require apparently undemocratic means.” Undemocratic means. “Liberating tolerance, then, would mean intolerance against movements from the Right and toleration of movements from the Left.” Very prescient.
He was/is certainly very influential on the radical left.

Ursula
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Ursula

Thank you for this share.

Righty
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Righty

One-dimentional man. Period.

Shyamoli
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Shyamoli

I have to write a term paper on Marcuse and the question that I am asking is- What does Marcuse mean by one-dimensional life and how does it relate to possibilities of happiness and freedom in our contemporary culture? I am planning to include the transformation of basic needs, the importance for opposition for a healthy society, and the differences between individual and social satisfaction. Am I on the right track…anyone?

Thanks.

Audrey C
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Audrey C

interesting bit about the youth movements…although imho there is much more to them!

Vaclav
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Vaclav

good to see and hear the legendary Marcuse speak,,,,,,,